?

Log in

No account? Create an account
William Klein: человек с камерой. - RuGuru - masters of photography [entries|archive|friends|userinfo]
RuGuru - masters of photography

[ website | фотоссылки ]
[ userinfo | livejournal userinfo ]
[ archive | journal archive ]

William Klein: человек с камерой. [окт. 11, 2007|05:15 pm]
RuGuru - masters of photography

ruguru

[ana_lee]
Широко распространенным является утверждение, что фотографию как искусство в ХХ веке формировали в основном глянцевые журналы, по крайней мере ее техническую сторону, — редакции журналов, производители одежды и парфюмерии традиционно не скупятся на оплату зачастую рискованных экспериментов, предлагаемых фотографами. Не случайно именно в глянцевой фотографии стали известны такие имена, как Хорст П. Хорст, Ирвинг Пенн, Сесиль Битон, Сноудон, Хельмут Ньютон, Ричард Аведон или Сара Мун. Одним из ярчайших представителей этого бомонда фэшн-фотографии стал американец Уильям Кляйн, не считавший моду чем-то существенным, но получивший мировую славу именно благодаря съемкам моды. Судьба Кляйна во многом типична для представителя его фотографического поколения, однако это поколение таково, что чем-то типичным в данном случае является уникальность, как ни парадоксально на первый взгляд это звучит. Люди, создававшие из прикладного по сути занятия новое искусство, попадали в фотографию зачастую совершенно неожиданным для себя образом. Уильям Кляйн не являлся исключением.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Barbara plus Coffee Filter, Paris 1956

William Klein said of his subject: 'Barbara Mullen was the first model I really related to, because she was a clown; she was really able to laugh at the scene and herself'. Here, Mullen brings fake drama to a most prosaic activity - making coffee.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Barbara, Over Gadgeted, Does Lips, Paris 1956

William Klein was able to take risks in his fashion photographs because, as he said, 'as long as I showed the clothes, the magazine didn't care what I did'. Here, Barbara Mullen makes a production of applying her lipstick while smoking a cigarette through its long holder. The image is a parody of fashion magazines' obsessions with useless and ridiculously expensive gadgets and nonsensical rituals.


Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Barbara With Black Flower Snack, Paris 1956
William Klein thought it was amazing how you couldn't recognize his favorite model, Barbara Mullen, from one photo to another. 'She wasn't really beautiful,' he said, 'but she moved and wore makeup in such a graphic way that she had something else.' That something else was a willingness to go against the snooty femininity of typical fashion photographs of the time. In this picture, Klein captured Mullen's goofing for the camera and childlike appetite for play - she would just as soon eat her hat as wear it.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Barbara with Hat and Five Roses, 1956
Hat with Five Roses is a true icon - one of the most famous fashion photographs of the last 40 years. Gracing around 50 separate magazine covers since the photo was taken in 1956, its combination of allure, eye-catching directness and striking composition has made it a lasting favorite - this silver print is one of William Klein's most popular works, selling consistently into a knowledgeable market. Barbara Mullen was Klein's favorite model, a notorious character at a time when there were no individually recognized 'supermodels'. Her chameleon-like abilities meant that she was often unrecognizable from shot to shot, adopting a different personality with each pose. Here she plays an ambiguous femme fatale - half hidden behind a smokescreen, with her black eyes echoing the dark backdrop, pulling on her cigarette butt like a sailor under an absurdly chic hat

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Barbara in Night Cap, Paris 1956
William Klein claimed that you couldn't recognize Barbara Mullen - his favorite model - from one photo to another, due to her uncanny ability to slip into different personas before the camera. 'She wasn't really beautiful,' he said, 'but she moved and wore makeup in such a graphic way that she had something else.'

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Barbara in the 20's, 1956
William Klein described Barbara Mullen as 'just a girl from the streets', but she had a chameleonic quality that made her his favorite fashion model. Here - laughing at fashion's tendency to reach into the recent past for inspiration - he showed her pretending to be a sophisticated habitu' of 'Gay Paris' in the 20s

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Evelyn Tripp, Paris 1958

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Simone Daillencourt, Nina Devos, Capucci, Rome, 1960

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Mary, Policeman and Sailor., 1957

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
'I Love Secretaries', 1955
Series 'Life is Good and Good for You in New York' (1954-55). Although among Klein's very first photographs, they quickly became a remarkable 'cause celebre'. Part fond family album for his native New York, part furious satire on the city, when published in Paris they struck dissonant chords with the anecdotal and poetic strains of the prominent European photographers of the time, Cartier-Bresson and Robert Doisneau. Klein's small psychodramas had a new sensibility the irreverence of Dada, the curiosities of Surrealism and the flavors of ugly, popular Americana. Klein was fascinated by the rude interruption of mass media and brash signography into the fabric of daily urban life. His figures always seem awkwardly posed beside its slick injunctions . They struggle and are lonely, while the images promise all. Klein summed it all up in the chapter entitled 'I Need'.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Supermarket andGun, 1955
Series 'Life is Good and Good for You in New York'. Klein's many images of kids with guns, collected in the chapter 'Gun', have become some of the most famous images of the series. As he said, 'It's..part of the fake violence which, in New York, can become real violence in two seconds. But it is very often psychodrama.' For Klein, these moments were as much about absurd irreverent comedy as prophetic warning.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Broadway and 103rd Street, New York, 1954-55

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Candy Store, Amsterdam Avenue, New York, 1954-55

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Dance in Brooklyn, 1955

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Girl Dancing in Brooklyn, 1955
Series 'Life is Good and Good for You in New York' (1954-55). 'The light as going,' he said, 'I used a slow shutter speed. This was towards the beginning of my photographic adventure. It was only the day after that I discovered what the blur could contribute'.
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Black Women, Profile in Crowd, 1955
Crowds, profiles and candid shots were William Klein's staple in the New York series, and he became adept at picturing the momentary actions of strangers in compositions caught with a wide-angle lens. If David Reisman summed up the post-war American mood in his novel 'The Lonely Crowd', this was its visual representation.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Woman and Saks, 1955
Saks's flagship department store had been a fixture on Fifth Avenue since 1924, so the connotations were already clear for Klein in the 50s. Such up-close and unflattering candid shots of the wealthy were typical of one of Klein's acknowledged influences, Weegee, who had covered the smart set for New York tabloids. This was a fine tribute

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
7Up, 1954
This shot - a detail of a scene he included in his original volume - captures the essence of what Klein called 'Surrealist suburbia'. The original scene depicted a clump of trees covered in small tin-plate adverts 'outside a diner in Long Island, almost every tree bearing its message', Klein wrote.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Stood Up at Childs, 1955
Klein was fascinated by the cheap functionalism of the period's automat restaurants, and Childs' was a famous chain which had been in New York since 1889. By this stage however, the self service eateries were going out of fashion, becoming sorry, shabby resorts associated with the loitering homeless.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Man Foreground, Woman Behind, 1955
Klein's shots of teeming crowds, of general street life and its spectators, were absolutely central to the New York series, and he devoted a chapter just to them, 'Streets'. Such overbearing figures as these, rushing past angry or ambivalent, are emblematic of post-war American photography.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Mighty Mouse, 1954
Klein loved parades and said he never missed a single one while working on the New York project. The Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, where this was taken, was perhaps the greatest of them all. On returning to New York by boat, sweeping into the harbour, Klein recalled feeling 'like a Macy's parade balloon floating back after a million orbits.'

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, Broadway, 1954-55

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
St Patricks Day, 1955
This image has all the curious antics and parade celebrations which were some of Klein's favorite themes in the New York series. The St. Patrick's Day Parade was an obvious attraction, something that had been an institution of New York life since the very first one in 1766. Typically, Klein caught those involved a little off-guard.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
4 Girls, Easter Sunday, 1955
Klein loved awkward glamour, and this shot of young girls from Harlem, stepping out in style for Easter Sunday, was also a perfect conjunction with another favorite theme, children. But in contrast to his shots of big city nightlife and young fashions, this image has a warmer, less knowing, somehow more contented heart.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Kids Making Faces, 1955
The rude pleasures of young kids playing on the street were one of Klein's greatest enthusiasms, typical of the volume's chapters 'Funk' and 'Gun'. It was something he also shared with contemporaries such as Helen Levitt, finding the anarchic poses and curious games of the poorest children a strange echo of surrealist art.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Star Spangled Banner, 1955
Ebbets Field was a famous ballpark, home turf for the Brooklyn Dodgers baseball team. Perhaps it made a perfect subject for Klein's melancholic eye as it was to close only tow years later in 1957. Certainly the mood captured here was typical of his photographs: the National Anthem was playing, but the crowd are not a picture of pride

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Three Kids and Flag, 1955
As Klein said himself, when he was working on the New York book, 'I never missed a parade'. This image combines the parade with another of the volume's interests, young children on the street, to capture what for Klein were clashes of personalities and loyalties, boredom and excitement.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Man Looks at Camera in Crowd, 1955
Street scene confrontations such as these are not only typical of Klein's volume on New York but emblematic of a whole school of urban American photographers, including Robert Frank and Diane Arbus. Just as Klein always saw himself, the new photographers had become fine artists, spies, ethnographers and satirists; the public weren't always willing accomplices.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Rant, 1954
Klein adored New York's neon cityscape, and transformed the fragments of words into abstract compositions which float quite free of the buildings they light - and reflect, in this case the Chrysler Building.The success of images such as these, which are heavily influenced by the irreverence of Dada, led him to make the film 'Broadway by Light' shortly afterwards.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Somersault, 1955
In 1956, William Klein's defining book, New York, caused a sensation - it pioneered the harshly cropped 'snapshot aesthetic' that so perfectly captured the buzz of the metropolis. The photographs were some of Klein's earliest, and were taken when he returned to the city after a long absence in Europe. 'I roamed the streets with the ultimate secret weapon: the Truth Camera,' Klein recalls, astonished that nobody had thought of making this work before. 'What amazed me, minute after minute, was that it was all there for the taking.'

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Class of 55, 1955
Series 'Life is Good and Good for You in New York'. Curiously, Klein's book was taken on by its publisher as a guide book, and so he devoted the last chapter, 'City', to the subject of the concrete cityscape. But for Klein, mass media, sign boards and posters had become an integral part of the fabric of that timeless landscape - smearing it, as much as enriching it.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Crowd, Palladium Ballroom, 1955
Klein had what he called a 'devouring hunger for faces, bodies, crowds' and this clamorous scene in New York's Palladian Ballroom was clearly an irresistible attraction. Many images such as this one, of the brash excitement of metropolitan night-life, were brought together in the 'Funk' chapter of the book.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Theater Tickets, New York, 1955

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
St Patrick's Day, Fifth Avenue, 1954-55

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Gun 2, Little Italy, 1955<

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Horn & Hardart, Lexington Avenue, 1954-55/div>
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
William Klein

Он родился в 1928 году в Нью-Йорке в семье еврейских иммигрантов, обедневших вскоре после того, как в год рождения Уильяма обанкротилась маленькая мастерская его отца по пошиву одежды. Бедность семьи Кляйнов еще больше бросалась в глаза на фоне достатка их родственников, преимущественно адвокатов, среди которых отец Уильяма настойчиво пытался распространять страховки, чтобы хоть как-то свести концы с концами. Отрочество Кляйна пришлось на вторую половину 30-х, время, когда в Америке сильны были антисемитские настроения, которые довольно рано коснулись и будущего фотографа, — будучи и бедным и евреем одновременно, Кляйн мучительно привыкал к положению изгоя. В это время его вторым домом становится нью-йоркский Музей современного искусства, где Кляйн проводил массу времени. Рано проявившиеся способности и живой ум Кляйна позволили ему поступить в колледж на три года раньше обычного срока, но он не закончил обучения по специальности социолога, — незадолго до окончания колледжа Кляйна призвали в армию США.

Именно на военной службе Кляйн в первый раз попал в Европу, а когда в 1948 году он демобилизовался, специальный грант на обучение, полученный им после службы в соответствии с «солдатским биллем о правах», помог ему поступить в парижскую Сорбонну, где вчерашний солдат занялся скульптурой. Вскоре Кляйн женится на француженке, и Париж надолго станет его домом и одним из самых любимых городов мира. Для будущего фотографа французская столица стала еще и тем местом, где он смог почувствовать себя независимым от своей семьи, с ее буржуазным укладом и презрением к увлечению Кляйна искусством. В Париже американец знакомится с ветераном кубизма Фернаном Леже, взгляды которого на искусство существенно повлияли на молодого скульптора. Творческий максимализм и бескомпромиссность Леже помогли Кляйну осознать необходимость поиска своего собственного пути в искусстве. Не менее важной встречей для Кляйна стало знакомство с Ман Рэем, еще одним «парижским американцем», уникальные работы которого возводили фотографию, отчасти продолжающую в то время считаться прикладным ремеслом, на уровень настоящего штучного искусства.

В это время у Кляйна появляется его первый Rolleiflex, который он осваивал самостоятельно, фотографируя буквально все, что видел вокруг. Специально фотографии Кляйн никогда не учился, подобно большинству известных фотографов его времени, да и сегодня преподавательская деятельность всемирно известного фотохудожника ограничивается редкими мастер-классами. Кляйну скучно учить других, по его мнению, необходимо ко всему прийти самому, как это делал он в начале пятидесятых. Прежде, чем посвятить себя светописи, Кляйн успешно начал карьеру скульптора, занимаясь также созданием абстрактных фресок для французских и итальянских архитекторов. Казалось, в жизни молодого скульптора все предрешено и вполне предсказуемо.

Однако фотография ворвалась в его жизнь и резко изменила ее. Поначалу Уильям Кляйн начал интересоваться фотографией преимущественно как прикладным инструментом, он использовал светочувствительные материалы в своих скульптурах и фотографировал их в движении в то время, когда работал в парижской студии Фернана Леже. Но случилось то, что и должно было случиться: он страстно увлекся фотографией и снимал все больше и больше, пока в 1954 году его работы не увидел случайно зашедший в студию арт-директор нью-йоркского Vogue, Александр Либерман, который и предложил Кляйну первый профессиональный контракт фэшн-фотографа. Поначалу Либерман предлагал Кляйну стать его заместителем в Vogue, однако место помощника арт-директора в ведущем мировом журнале не устроило вчерашнего скульптора, он не хотел карьеры, о которой многие тысячи подобных ему могли только мечтать, он хотел только фотографировать. Либерман увидел в его работах тот свежий взгляд, которого, как ему казалось, недоставало в журнале в тот период. Жесткость, которой были проникнуты снимки Кляйна, уравновешивала некоторый крен редакционной политики журнала в сторону рафинированных изображений «а-ля Сесиль Битон». Кляйн рассказал Либерману о своих планах, он хотел снимать Нью-Йорк совершенно по-новому, так, как этого еще никто до него не делал: «Я дам под дых этому городу своей «Лейкой». Финансировать рискованное мероприятие должен был Vogue, а Кляйн, никогда до того не имевший дела с фэшн-фотографией, обязался снимать моду.

Поначалу фотограф попросту не умел пользоваться студийной аппаратурой, именно это заставило его снимать своих моделей прямо на нью-йоркских улицах. Этот прием сразу стал «визитной карточкой» Уильяма Кляйна, тем новаторским жестом, который сходу поставил его в ряд с известнейшими фэшн-фотографами того времени. Кляйн, исповедовавший принцип минимализма, придумал также ставший широко известным прием с зеркалами, этот трюк впоследствии использовался самыми разными фотографами, в числе которых был даже Хельмут Ньютон, не склонный поддаваться чьим-либо влияниям. Наиболее известными примерами использования зеркал стали фотографии 1963 года, снятые для Christiаn Dior или и для Pierre Cardin, где модель бесконечное количество раз отражается в зеркальной призме. Позднее Кляйн продолжил экспериментировать с различными способами съемки, легализовав не принятые ранее в съемках моды широкоугольные и телеобъективы, длинную экспозицию с использованием вспышки и мультиэкспозицию. Уильяма Кляйна называют также изобретателем snapshot aesthetics («эстетика выстрела навскидку»). Квазирепортажный стиль Кляйна вызывал плохо скрываемое раздражение у многих признанных мастеров жанра, исповедовавших классическую заповедь «невидимости» фотографа, его полного невмешательства в происходящее в кадре. Ульям Кляйн напротив активно взаимодействовал со снимаемыми им людьми, часто он подносил камеру к самому лицу модели, которая вовсе не желала быть запечатленной. Он стал одним из первых провокаторов в фэшн-индустрии и уж явно не был тем фотографом, который старается остаться незамеченным во что бы то ни стало. В то время в мире фотографии доминировала теория «решающего момента», типичным и ярчайшим представителем которой был Анри Картье-Брессон. Фотограф должен дождаться в меняющемся потоке событий того единственного момента, когда сделанный кадр будет гармоничным и сбалансированным. Ценя работы Брессона, Кляйн, тем не менее, шел собственным путем, отчасти напоминавшим богоборчество, он сознательно нарушал брессоновские табу, делая все прямо противоположным принятому образом. Брессон исповедовал теорию «невидимого фотографа», «мухи на стене» — Кляйн активно влиял на ситуацию в кадре. Брессон никогда не кадрировал изображение, Кляйн кадрировал все или почти все свои снимки. Фотограф отказался от тщательно выстроенной композиции и технического совершенства снимка в пользу его большей спонтанности и естественности. Изображение на его снимках часто было размытым или не в фокусе, отпечатки казались излишне жесткими и контрастными, местами они были ближе к графике, чем к фотографии. Повышенная зернистость его отпечатков объяснялась тем, что во время съемки фотограф не пользовался экспонометром, полагаясь на собственный опыт, и негативы зачастую были переэкспонированы или недодержаны. В итоге изображение получалось грубым, нервным. В фотографиях Кляйна не было ничего от того, что обычно ожидают от фотографии подобного рода. Кляйн так и не стал своим в глянцево-журнальной среде, он не только не любил студийной работы с моделями, но и совершенно не интересовался одеждой. После съемки он никогда не мог вспомнить, какие именно модели одежды он фотографировал сегодня, если его расспрашивала об этом жена. Он всячески избегал встреч и согласований с редакторами отдела моды Vogue: «Я никогда не являлся на встречи со всеми этими дамами в шляпках и в огромных очках». Все это выглядело более чем вызывающе для человека, живущего за счет модной фотографии. Однако мода для фотографа была скорее не средой обитания, а объектом слегка насмешливого исследования. В случае Кляйна именно его недостаточный интерес к миру большой моды позволил ему занять свое место в мире большой фотографии. От того, что Кляйн пришел именно в фэшн-фотографию, в результате выиграл как сам фотограф, так и жанр. Кляйн сделал мир моды ареной для своих экспериментов и, отрицая существующий в его время изобразительный язык глянцевых журналов, невольно стал одним из главных его изобретателей, тех, кто сформировал лицо современной фэшн-фотографии. Сам же Кляйн получил финансовую независимость и славу, что существенно облегчило реализацию других творческих идей, казавшихся ему более важными: «Я считаю, что мода — это глупость. И я снимал ее с юмором. Но я воспользовался тем, что мне хорошо платили в Vogue. Для меня это была простая работа, она занимала всего месяца два в году».

Первая книга Уильяма Кляйна «Нью-Йорк» (1956) по сути состояла из ежедневного фотодневника — репортажных уличных фотографий, почти случайным образом собранных вместе и графически оформленных в стиле таблоидной прессы. Это была совершенно нетипичная продукция для глянцевой индустрии того времени. Представители редакции Vogue выразили недоумение, когда Кляйн принес материал будущей книги в надежде заключить контракт на ее издание. По мнению редакционного истеблишмента, Нью-Йорк Кляйна выглядел слишком «грубо, агрессивно и вульгарно», редакторы отказались взять материал и предсказали фотографу большие трудности в поиске достаточно смелых издателей для этой книги. Они оказались правы — Кляйн так и не смог найти издателя в США и только в Париже он выпустил в свет свой нью-йоркский альбом. Позднее книга «Нью-Йорк» стала настоящей классикой, она была удостоена премии Надара и выдержала массу переизданий. Надо сказать, Кляйн не стремился шокировать публику, его изобразительный язык возник не из желания сделать все против правил, скорее это было результатом творческой эволюции фотографа, образование которого позволяло ему проводить не вполне принятые в то время аналогии с другими, более традиционными видами искусства: «Для меня в книге «Нью-Йорк» не было никакого скандала. Я был художником, и я знал, что в живописи в XX веке было очень много экспериментов. А в фотографии почти не было. Были эксперименты в Баухаузе, у русских конструктивистов. И, строго говоря, все. Для меня это был не скандал, а эксперимент». Действительно, сегодня фотографии Кляйна конца пятидесятых давно утратили скандальный флер, сопутствовавший им в те годы, оставаясь смелыми, бескомпромиссными и далекими от формальных критериев качества, они воспринимаются скорее как удачная попытка расширить своеобразный «словарь», которым пользовалась фотография, и первая книга Кляйна стала значительным событием в новейшей истории искусств. Позднее Кляйн продолжил серию книг, посвященных интересовавшим его городам, один за одним стали выходить его альбомы, посвященные другим городам, с которыми фотограф связал свою творческую судьбу, — Риму, Москве, Токио и Парижу. Все свои книги — от подбора фотографий до выбора шрифта и дизайна обложки — Кляйн оформлял сам.

Уже после выхода своей первой книги Кляйн становится широко известен в Европе, а в 1962 году международное жюри Photokina-1963 включило его в список 30 наиболее влиятельных фотографов своего времени.

В 1962 году Уильям Кляйн на некоторое время оставил фотографию и посвятил себя производству кинофильмов, среди которых были и экспериментальные картины «Кто вы, Полли Мэггу?» (1966) и «Мистер Фридом» (1968), в которых Кляйн позволил себе вволю поиронизировать как над фэшн-индустрией вообще, так и над родным Vogue в частности.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Serge Gainsbourg
Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting
Serge Gainsbourg

В конце семидесятых Кляйн вернулся в большую фотографию, он снимал в основном уличные репортажи, используя очень широкоугольные объективы, а в девяностых маэстро занялся созданием медиаработ с использованием живописи и фотографии. Что бы ни делал Кляйн, его работы автоматически попадали в разряд шедевров и выставлялись в лучших музеях мира. Токио, Амстердам, Кельн, Нью-Йорк, Москва — такова география выставок одного из патриархов фотографии. Монография об Уильяме Кляйне «Апертура», изданная в 1981 году, стала одной из самых популярных книг в своем жанре. Сегодня Кляйн живет и работает в Париже, продолжая путешествовать по всему миру вместе с выставками своих работ. Для ценителей Уильям Кляйн олицетворяет собой то великое поколение фотографов, которое, придя в фэшн-фотографию из художественных мастерских, сумело сделать из считавшегося прикладным и ремесленническим жанра настоящий новый вид искусства, с собственными законами и визуальным языком, с собственной мифологией и легендами. Именно такой легендой еще при жизни стал Уильям Кляйн.
linkОтветить

Comments:
[User Picture]From: md_rokkor
2007-10-11 05:33 pm
"Жизнь фотографа - это две секунды" (с) Уильям Кляйн
Из фильма "Contacts"
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: lotus_feet
2007-10-11 05:45 pm
Давно я не получала такого удовольсвтия от чтения и просмотра поста. Аххх. огромное спасибо.Это было интереснооооо.
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: patricia_night
2007-10-11 06:50 pm
Ещё одно спасибо от меня :)
Второй чудесный пост за день!
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: m_pavlovsky
2007-10-11 09:47 pm
сказать спасибо-это почти ничего...
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: muse_ordinary
2007-10-12 08:06 am
Barbara и Dovima, пожалуй, самые красивые модели такого времени
обожаю
спасибо за пост
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: som_a
2007-10-13 04:14 pm
spasibo za takoi zame4atelni nasishenni post!
(Ответить) (Thread)
[User Picture]From: keyman
2007-10-23 09:31 am
настоящая стрит-фотография! спасибо.

PS: только слов вокруг много, было бы достаточно только фотографий.
(Ответить) (Thread)